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DRIVING  AROUND SCOTLAND
The roads are gorgeous, easy to drive, not busy but accidents in Scotland may be waiting to happen

The harvested pine trees were thundering towards the white van at a closing speed of 120 miles an hour on the single track road. The driver of the low loader was a gruff Highlander who knew all the bends. In the opposite direction was a Glaswegian, driving a white van at the limit of 60mph in the opposite direction.  

They  screeched to a halt simultaneously. Not because they could not pass each other, but because they could not pass each other without killing the little lamb, sunning itself by the roadside.  Rubbing its feet together, eyes closed, smiling in the sunshine it was.

They crawled between the lamb on one side of the road and its unconcerned mother munching away on the other grass verge. “The little sod has been keeping me up bleating all night, I’ve got to get something to eat,” she seemed to say “The cars always stop.” These tough Highland drivers may be the ones you want on your side in a fight, but faced with a tiny new born lamb by  the side of  the road, they are just big Jessies

The roads in the Highlands are unremittingly beautiful. You’ll look at the hills, the colours, the wildlife, the lochs, the distant mountains, the forests - all stunning, everywhere.. But there is a hidden menace. Car accidents.

Six Scottish driving problems

1. The speed of the traffic on Scottish A roads is between 35 and 45 mph. Drivers get impatient.
2. They overtake where they shouldn’t.. On blind bends and on blind summits.
3. Many drivers in the Highlands drive too close to the car in front.
4. There are not many two carriageway roads suitable for overtaking
5. Drink driving accidents occur after 9.00pm, as everywhere.
6. Motorcyclists can be lethal, overtaking on bends
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The accident rate in the Highlands is improving.

Tthere has been a steady decrease in the number of road accidents in the West Highlands over the past years and the trend is continuing.
Driving in Scotland